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Most recent paper | Forum of resting-state fMRI

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Syndicate content NCBI pubmed
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="resting"[All Fields] AND "fMRI"[All Fields]
Updated: 51 min 41 sec ago

Increased Low-Frequency Oscillation Amplitude of Sensorimotor Cortex Associated with the Severity of Structural Impairment in Cervical Myelopathy.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30

Increased Low-Frequency Oscillation Amplitude of Sensorimotor Cortex Associated with the Severity of Structural Impairment in Cervical Myelopathy.

PLoS One. 2014;9(8):e104442

Authors: Zhou F, Gong H, Liu X, Wu L, Luk KD, Hu Y

Abstract
Decreases in metabolites and increased motor-related, but decreased sensory-related activation of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) have been observed in patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) using advanced MRI techniques. However, the nature of intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC, and the relationship between cerebral function and structural damage of the spinal cord in patients with CM are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to assess intrinsic neuronal activity by calculating the regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI), and correlations with clinical and imaging indices. Nineteen patients and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects underwent rs-fMRI scans. ALFF measurements were performed in the SMC, a key brain network likely to impaired or reorganized patients with CM. Compared with healthy subjects, increased amplitude of cortical low-frequency oscillations (LFO) was observed in the right precentral gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and left supplementary motor area. Furthermore, increased z-ALFF values in the right precentral gyrus and right postcentral gyrus correlated with decreased fractional anisotropy values at the C2 level, which indicated increased intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC corresponding to the structural impairment in the spinal cord of patients with CM. These findings suggest a complex and diverging relationship of cortical functional reorganization and distal spinal anatomical compression in patients with CM and, thus, add important information in understanding how spinal cord integrity may be a factor in the intrinsic covariance of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations of BOLD signals involved in cortical plasticity.

PMID: 25111566 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Characteristics of the default mode functional connectivity in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease using resting state fMRI with a combined approach of entropy-based and graph theoretical measurements.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30

Characteristics of the default mode functional connectivity in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease using resting state fMRI with a combined approach of entropy-based and graph theoretical measurements.

Neuroimage. 2014 Aug 8;

Authors: Toussaint PJ, Maiz S, Coynel D, Doyon J, Messé A, de Souza LC, Sarazin M, Perlbarg V, Habert MO, Benali H

Abstract
Cognitive decline in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease (AD) emerges from functional disruption in the coordination of large-scale brain systems sustaining cognition. Integrity of these systems can be examined by correlation methods based on analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Here we investigate functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) in normal ageing and AD using resting state fMRI. Images from young and elderly controls, and patients with AD were processed using spatial independent component analysis to identify the DMN. Functional connectivity was quantified using integration and indices derived from graph theory. Four DMN sub-systems were identified: Frontal (medial and superior), Parietal (precuneus-posterior cingulate, lateral parietal), Temporal (medial temporal), and Hippocampal (bilateral). There was a decrease in antero-posterior interactions (lower global efficiency), but increased interactions within the Frontal and Parietal sub-systems (higher local clustering) in elderly compared to young controls. This decreased antero-posterior integration was more pronounced in AD patients compared to elderly controls, particularly in the precuneus-posterior cingulate region. Conjoint knowledge of integration measures and graph indices in the same data helps in the interpretation of functional connectivity results, as comprehension of one measure improves with understanding of the other. The approach allows for complete characterisation of connectivity changes and could be applied to other resting state networks and different pathologies.

PMID: 25111470 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Synchronous activation within the default mode network correlates with perceived social support.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30

Synchronous activation within the default mode network correlates with perceived social support.

Neuropsychologia. 2014 Aug 8;

Authors: Che X, Zhao J, Wei D, Li B, Guo Y, Qiu J, Zhang Q, Liu Y

Abstract
Perceived social support emphasizes subjective feeling of provisions offered by family, friends and significant others. In consideration of the great significance of perceived social support to health outcomes, attempt to reveal the neural substrates of perceived social support will facilitate its application in a series of mental disorders. Perceived social support potentially relies on healthy interpersonal relationships calling for cognitive processes like perspective taking, empathy and theory of mind. Interestingly, functional activations and connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) are extensively involved in these interpersonal skills. As a result, it is proposed that synchronous activities among brain regions within the DMN will correlate with self-report of perceived social support. In the present study, we tried to investigate the associations between coherence among the DMN regions and perceived social support at resting state. A total of 333 (145 men) participants were directed to fulfill the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) after a 484-seconds functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning without any task. As a result, seed-based functional connectivity and power spectrum analyses revealed that heightened synchronicity among the DMN regions was associated with better performance on perceived social support. Moreover, results in the present study were independent of different methods, structural changes, and general cognitive performance.

PMID: 25111033 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Spontaneous neural activity alterations in temporomandibular disorders: a cross-sectional and longitudinal resting-state fMRI study.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30

Spontaneous neural activity alterations in temporomandibular disorders: a cross-sectional and longitudinal resting-state fMRI study.

Neuroscience. 2014 Aug 8;

Authors: He S, Li F, Song F, Wu S, Chen J, He N, Zou S, Huang X, Lui S, Gong Q, Chen S

Abstract
The involvement of central nervous system in the pathophysiology of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) has been noticed. TMD patients have been shown dysfunction of motor performance and reduced cognitive ability in neuropsychological tests. The aim of this study is to explore the spontaneous neural activity in TMD patients with centric relation (CR)-maximum intercuspation (MI) discrepancy before and after stabilization splint treatment. Twenty-three patients and twenty controls underwent clinical evaluations, including CR-MI discrepancy, Helkimo indices and chronic pain, and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans at baseline. Eleven patients repeated the evaluations and scanning after the initial wearing (T1) and three months of wearing (T2) of the stabilization splint. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was calculated to compare the neural functions. At baseline, the patients showed decreased fALFF in the left precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area, middle frontal gyrus and right orbitofrontal cortex compared with the controls (P<0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Negative correlations were found between the fALFF in the left precentral gyrus and vertical CR-MI discrepancy of bilateral temporomandibular joints of patients (P<0.05, two-tailed). At T2, the symptoms and signs of the patients were improved, and a stable condylar position on the centric relation was recovered, with increased fALFF in the left precentral gyrus and left posterior insula compared with pretreatment. The fALFF decrease in the patients before treatment was no longer evident at T2 compared with the controls. The results suggested that TMD patients with CR-MI discrepancy showed significantly decreased brain activity in their frontal cortexes. The stabilization splint elicited functional recovery in these cortical areas. These findings provided insight into the cortical neuroplastic processes underlying TMD with CR-MI discrepancy and the therapeutic mechanisms of stabilization splint.

PMID: 25110816 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Multi-scale integration and predictability in resting state brain activity.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30
Related Articles

Multi-scale integration and predictability in resting state brain activity.

Front Neuroinform. 2014;8:66

Authors: Kolchinsky A, van den Heuvel MP, Griffa A, Hagmann P, Rocha LM, Sporns O, Goñi J

Abstract
The human brain displays heterogeneous organization in both structure and function. Here we develop a method to characterize brain regions and networks in terms of information-theoretic measures. We look at how these measures scale when larger spatial regions as well as larger connectome sub-networks are considered. This framework is applied to human brain fMRI recordings of resting-state activity and DSI-inferred structural connectivity. We find that strong functional coupling across large spatial distances distinguishes functional hubs from unimodal low-level areas, and that this long-range functional coupling correlates with structural long-range efficiency on the connectome. We also find a set of connectome regions that are both internally integrated and coupled to the rest of the brain, and which resemble previously reported resting-state networks. Finally, we argue that information-theoretic measures are useful for characterizing the functional organization of the brain at multiple scales.

PMID: 25104933 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Reversible functional connectivity disturbances during transient global amnesia.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30
Related Articles

Reversible functional connectivity disturbances during transient global amnesia.

Ann Neurol. 2014 May;75(5):634-43

Authors: Peer M, Nitzan M, Goldberg I, Katz J, Gomori JM, Ben-Hur T, Arzy S

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Transient global amnesia (TGA), an abrupt occurrence of severe anterograde episodic amnesia accompanied by repetitive questioning, has been known for more than 50 years. Despite extensive research, there is no clear evidence for the underlying pathophysiological basis of TGA. Moreover, there is no neuroimaging method to evaluate TGA in real time.
METHODS: Here we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded in 12 patients during the acute phase of TGA together with connectivity and cluster analyses to detect changes in the episodic memory network in TGA.
RESULTS: Our results show a significant reduction in functional connectivity of the episodic memory network during TGA, which is more pronounced in the hyperacute phase than in the postacute phase. This disturbance is bilateral, and reversible after recovery. Although the hippocampus and its connections are significantly impaired, other parts of the episodic memory network are also impaired. Similar results were obtained for the analysis of the episodic memory network whether it was defined in a data-driven or literature-based manner.
INTERPRETATION: These results suggest that TGA is related to a functional disturbance in the episodic memory network, and supply a neuroimaging correlate of TGA during the acute phase.

PMID: 24623317 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Altered resting-state activity in seasonal affective disorder.

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:30
Related Articles

Altered resting-state activity in seasonal affective disorder.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2014 Jan;35(1):161-72

Authors: Abou Elseoud A, Nissilä J, Liettu A, Remes J, Jokelainen J, Takala T, Aunio A, Starck T, Nikkinen J, Koponen H, Zang YF, Tervonen O, Timonen M, Kiviniemi V

Abstract
At present, our knowledge about seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is based mainly up on clinical symptoms, epidemiology, behavioral characteristics and light therapy. Recently developed measures of resting-state functional brain activity might provide neurobiological markers of brain disorders. Studying functional brain activity in SAD could enhance our understanding of its nature and possible treatment strategies. Functional network connectivity (measured using ICA-dual regression), and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) were measured in 45 antidepressant-free patients (39.78 ± 10.64, 30 ♀, 15 ♂) diagnosed with SAD and compared with age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls (HCs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. After correcting for Type 1 error at high model orders (inter-RSN correction), SAD patients showed significantly increased functional connectivity in 11 of the 47 identified RSNs. Increased functional connectivity involved RSNs such as visual, sensorimotor, and attentional networks. Moreover, our results revealed that SAD patients compared with HCs showed significant higher ALFF in the visual and right sensorimotor cortex. Abnormally altered functional activity detected in SAD supports previously reported attentional and psychomotor symptoms in patients suffering from SAD. Further studies, particularly under task conditions, are needed in order to specifically investigate cognitive deficits in SAD.

PMID: 22987670 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

An age-related shift of resting-state functional connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus: a potential mechanism for compensating motor performance decline in older adults.

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 14:00

An age-related shift of resting-state functional connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus: a potential mechanism for compensating motor performance decline in older adults.

Front Aging Neurosci. 2014;6:178

Authors: Mathys C, Hoffstaedter F, Caspers J, Caspers S, Südmeyer M, Grefkes C, Eickhoff SB, Langner R

Abstract
Healthy aging is associated with decline in basic motor functioning and higher motor control. Here, we investigated age-related differences in the brain-wide functional connectivity (FC) pattern of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which plays an important role in motor response control. As earlier studies revealed functional coupling between STN and basal ganglia, which both are known to influence the conservativeness of motor responses on a superordinate level, we tested the hypothesis that STN FC with the striatum becomes dysbalanced with age. To this end, we performed a seed-based resting-state analysis of fMRI data from 361 healthy adults (mean age: 41.8, age range: 18-85) using bilateral STN as the seed region of interest. Age was included as a covariate to identify regions showing age-related changes of FC with the STN seed. The analysis revealed positive FC of the STN with several previously described subcortical and cortical regions like the anterior cingulate and sensorimotor cortex, as well as not-yet reported regions including central and posterior insula. With increasing age, we observed reduced positive FC with caudate nucleus, thalamus, and insula as well as increased positive FC with sensorimotor cortex and putamen. Furthermore, an age-related reduction of negative FC was found with precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex. We suggest that this reduced de-coupling of brain areas involved in self-relevant but motor-unrelated cognitive processing (i.e. precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex) from the STN motor network may represent a potential mechanism behind the age-dependent decline in motor performance. At the same time, older adults appear to compensate for this decline by releasing superordinate motor control areas, in particular caudate nucleus and insula, from STN interference while increasing STN-mediated response control over lower level motor areas like sensorimotor cortex and putamen.

PMID: 25100995 [PubMed]

Dysregulated daily rhythmicity of neuronal resting-state networks in MCI patients.

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 14:00

Dysregulated daily rhythmicity of neuronal resting-state networks in MCI patients.

Chronobiol Int. 2014 Aug 6;:1-10

Authors: Blautzik J, Vetter C, Schneider A, Gutyrchik E, Reinisch V, Keeser D, Paolini M, Pöppel E, Bao Y, Reiser M, Roenneberg T, Meindl T

Abstract
In young healthy participants, the degree of daily rhythmicity largely varies across different neuronal resting-state networks (RSNs), while it is to date unknown whether this temporal pattern of activity is conserved in healthy and pathological aging. Twelve healthy elderly (mean age = 65.1 ± 5.7 years) and 12 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; mean age = 69.6 ± 6.2 years) underwent four resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans at fixed 2.5 h intervals throughout a day. Time courses of a RSN were extracted by a connectivity strength and a spatial extent approach performed individually for each participant. Highly rhythmic RSNs included a sensorimotor, a cerebellar and a visual network in healthy elderly; the least rhythmic RSNs in this group included a network associated with executive control and an orbitofrontal network. The degree of daily rhythmicity in aMCI patients was reduced and dysregulated. For healthy elderly, the findings are in accordance with results reported for young healthy participants suggesting a comparable distribution of daily rhythmicity across RSNs during healthy aging. In contrast, the reduction and dysregulation of daily rhythmicity observed in aMCI patients is presumably indicative of underlying neurodegenerative processes in this group.

PMID: 25099642 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Regional homogeneity abnormalities in patients with tensiontype headache: a resting-state fMRI study.

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 14:00

Regional homogeneity abnormalities in patients with tensiontype headache: a resting-state fMRI study.

Neurosci Bull. 2014 Aug 6;

Authors: Wang P, Du H, Chen N, Guo J, Gong Q, Zhang J, He L

Abstract
Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most prevalent type of primary headache. Many studies have shown that the pathogenesis of primary headache is associated with fine structural or functional changes. However, these studies were mainly based on migraine. The present study aimed to investigate whether TTH patients show functional disturbances compared with healthy subjects. We used restingstate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis to identify changes in the local synchronization of spontaneous activity in patients with TTH. Ten patients with TTH and 10 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in the study. After demographic and clinical characteristics were acquired, a 3.0-T MRI system was used to obtain resting-state fMRIs. Compared with healthy controls, the TTH group exhibited significantly lower ReHo values in the bilateral caudate nucleus, the precuneus, the putamen, the left middle frontal gyrus, and the superior frontal gyrus. There was no correlation between mean ReHo values in TTH patients and duration of TTH, number of attacks, duration of daily attacks, Visual Analogue Scale score, or Headache Impact Test-6 score. These results suggest that TTH patients exhibit reduced synchronization of neuronal activity in multiple regions involved in the integration and processing of pain signals.

PMID: 25098351 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The spinal cord is never at rest.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:30

The spinal cord is never at rest.

Elife (Cambridge). 2014;3:e03811

Authors: Eippert F, Tracey I

Abstract
Even when we are at rest, our spinal cords show spontaneous, yet well organised, fluctuations of activity that might reflect sensory and motor networks.

PMID: 25097250 [PubMed]

Resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:30

Resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord.

Elife (Cambridge). 2014;3:e02812

Authors: Barry RL, Smith SA, Dula AN, Gore JC

Abstract
Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is well established as one of the most powerful methods for mapping human brain function. Numerous studies have measured how low-frequency BOLD signal fluctuations from the brain are correlated between voxels in a resting state, and have exploited these signals to infer functional connectivity within specific neural circuits. However, to date there have been no previous substantiated reports of resting state correlations in the spinal cord. In a cohort of healthy volunteers, we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns, and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns. Our results demonstrate that low-frequency BOLD fluctuations are inherent in the spinal cord as well as the brain, and by analogy to cortical circuits, we hypothesize that these correlations may offer insight into the execution and maintenance of sensory and motor functions both locally and within the cerebrum.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.001.

PMID: 25097248 [PubMed]

Resting-state connectivity and functional specialization in human medial parieto-occipital cortex.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:30

Resting-state connectivity and functional specialization in human medial parieto-occipital cortex.

Brain Struct Funct. 2014 Aug 6;

Authors: Tosoni A, Pitzalis S, Committeri G, Fattori P, Galletti C, Galati G

Abstract
According to recent models of visuo-spatial processing, the medial parieto-occipital cortex is a crucial node of the dorsal visual stream. Evidence from neurophysiological studies in monkeys has indicated that the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS) contains three functionally and cytoarchitectonically distinct areas: the visual area V6 in the fundus of the POS, and the visuo-motor areas V6Av and V6Ad in a progressively dorsal and anterior location with respect to V6. Besides different topographical organization, cytoarchitectonics, and functional properties, these three monkey areas can also be distinguished based on their patterns of cortico-cortical connections. Thanks to wide-field retinotopic mapping, areas V6 and V6Av have been also mapped in the human brain. Here, using a combined approach of resting-state functional connectivity and task-evoked activity by fMRI, we identified a new region in the anterior POS showing a pattern of functional properties and cortical connections that suggests a homology with the monkey area V6Ad. In addition, we observed distinct patterns of cortical connections associated with the human V6 and V6Av which are remarkably consistent with those showed by the anatomical tracing studies in the corresponding monkey areas. Consistent with recent models on visuo-spatial processing, our findings demonstrate a gradient of functional specialization and cortical connections within the human POS, with more posterior regions primarily dedicated to the analysis of visual attributes useful for spatial navigation and more anterior regions primarily dedicated to analyses of spatial information relevant for goal-directed action.

PMID: 25096286 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Alterations of regional homogeneity in pediatric bipolar depression: a resting-state fMRI study.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:30

Alterations of regional homogeneity in pediatric bipolar depression: a resting-state fMRI study.

BMC Psychiatry. 2014 Aug 6;14(1):222

Authors: Gao W, Jiao Q, Lu S, Zhong Y, Qi R, Lu D, Xiao Q, Yang F, Lu G, Su L

Abstract
BackgroundPediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) has attracted increasing attentions due to its high prevalence and great influence on social functions of children and adolescents. However, the pathophysiology underlying PBD remains unclear. In the present study, the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to detect abnormalities of baseline brain functions in depressed PBD youth.MethodsSeventeen youth with PBD-depression aged 10 - 18 years old and 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls were recruited in this study. The fMRI data under resting state were obtained on a Siemens 3.0 Tesla scanner and were analyzed using the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Correlations between the ReHo values of each survived area and the severity of depression symptoms in patients were further analyzed.ResultsAs compared with the control group, PBD-depression patients showed decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus, and the right putamen. Significant negative correlations of the mood and feelings questionnaire scores with mean ReHo values in the medial frontal gyrus and the right middle frontal gyrus in PBD-depression patients were observed.ConclusionOur results suggest that extensive regions with altered baseline brain activities are existed in PBD-depression and these brain regions mainly locate in the fronto-limbic circuit and associated striatal structures. Moreover, the present findings also add to our understanding that there could be unique neuropathophysiological mechanisms underlying PBD-depression.

PMID: 25095790 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Group-PCA for very large fMRI datasets.

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 12:30

Group-PCA for very large fMRI datasets.

Neuroimage. 2014 Aug 2;

Authors: Smith SM, Hyvärinen A, Varoquaux G, Miller KL, Beckmann CF

Abstract
Increasingly-large datasets (for example, the resting-state fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project) are demanding analyses that are problematic because of the sheer scale of the aggregate data. We present two approaches for applying group-level PCA; both give a close approximation to the output of PCA applied to full concatenation of all individual datasets, while having very low memory requirements regardless of the number of datasets being combined. Across a range of realistic simulations, we find that in most situations, both methods are more accurate than current popular approaches for analysis of multi-subject resting-state fMRI studies. The group-PCA output can be used to feed into a range of further analyses that are then rendered practical, such as the estimation of group-averaged voxelwise connectivity, group-level parcellation, and group-ICA.

PMID: 25094018 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Neuronal or Hemodynamic? Grappling with the Functional MRI Signal.

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 12:30

Neuronal or Hemodynamic? Grappling with the Functional MRI Signal.

Brain Connect. 2014 Aug 5;

Authors: Bandettini P

Abstract
MRI and fMRI continue to advance because creative physicists, engineers, neuroscientists, clinicians, and physiologists find new ways for pulling out more information from the signal. Innovations in pulse sequence design, paradigm design, and processing methods have advanced the field and have firmly established fMRI as a cornerstone for understanding the human brain. In this paper, the field of fMRI is described through consideration of the central problem of separating hemodynamic from neuronal information. Discussed here are examples of how pulse sequences, activation paradigms, and processing methods are integrated such that novel, high quality information can be obtained. Examples include the extraction of information such as activation onset latency, metabolic rate, neuronal adaptation, vascular patency, vessel diameter, vigilance, and sub voxel activation. Experimental measures include time series latency, hemodynamic shape, MR phase, multi-voxel patterns, ratios of activation related R2* to R2, metabolic rate changes, fluctuation correlations and frequencies, changes in fluctuation correlations and frequencies over time, resting correlation "states," echo time dependence, and more.

PMID: 25093397 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Connectomic Profiles for Individualized Resting State Networks and ROIs.

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 17:00

Connectomic Profiles for Individualized Resting State Networks and ROIs.

Brain Connect. 2014 Aug 4;

Authors: Li K, Langley J, Li Z, Hu X

Abstract
Functional connectivity analysis of human brain resting state fMRI data and resultant functional networks, or RSNs, have drawn increasing interest in both research and clinical applications. A fundamental yet challenging problem is to identify distinct functional regions or ROIs that have accurate functional correspondence across subjects. This paper presents an algorithmic framework to identify ROIs of common RSNs at the individual level. It first employed a dual-sparsity dictionary learning to extract group connectomic profiles of ROIs and RSNs from noisy and high dimensional fMRI data, with special attention to the well-known inter-subject variability in anatomy and then identified the ROIs of a given individual by employing both anatomic and group connectomic profile constraints using an energy minimization approach. Applications of this framework demonstrated that it can identify individualized ROIs of RSNs with superior performance over commonly-used registration methods in terms of functional correspondence, and a test-retest study revealed that the framework is robust and consistent across both short-interval and long-interval repeated sessions of the same population. These results indicate that our framework can provide accurate substrates for individualized resting state fMRI analysis.

PMID: 25090040 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Comparison of Statistical Tests for Group Differences in Brain Functional Networks.

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 15:30

Comparison of Statistical Tests for Group Differences in Brain Functional Networks.

Neuroimage. 2014 Jul 30;

Authors: Kim J, Wozniak JR, Mueller BA, Shen X, Pan W

Abstract
Brain functional connectivity has been studied by analyzing time series correlations in regional brain activities based on resting-state fMRI data. Brain functional connectivity can be depicted as a network or graph defined as a set of nodes linked by edges. Nodes represent brain regions and an edge measures the strength of functional correlation between two regions. Most of existing work focuses on estimation of such a network. A key but inadequately addressed question is how to test for possible differences of the networks between two subject groups, say between healthy controls and patients. Here we illustrate and compare the performance of several state-of-the-art statistical tests drawn from the neuroimaging, genetics, ecology and high-dimensional data literatures. Both real and simulated data were used to evaluate the methods. We found that, Network Based Statistic (NBS) performed well in many but not all situations, and its performance critically depends on the choice of its threshold parameter, which is unknown and difficult to choose in practice. Importantly, two adaptive statistical tests called adaptive sum of powered score (aSPU) and its weighted version (aSPUw) are easy to use and complementary to NBS, being higher powered than NBS in some situations. The aSPU and aSPUw tests can be also applied to adjust for covariates. Between the aSPU and aSPUw tests, they often, but not always, performed similarly with neither one as a uniform winner. On the other hand, Multivariate Matrix Distance Regression (MDMR) has been applied to detect group differences for brain connectivity; with the usual choice of the Euclidean distance, MDMR is a special case of the aSPU test. Consequently NBS, aSPU and aSPUw tests are recommended to test for group differences in functional connectivity.

PMID: 25086298 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children.

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 15:30

Age effects on the default mode and control networks in typically developing children.

J Psychiatr Res. 2014 Jul 18;

Authors: Sato JR, Salum GA, Gadelha A, Picon FA, Pan PM, Vieira G, Zugman A, Hoexter MQ, Anés M, Moura LM, Gomes Del'Aquilla MA, Amaro E, McGuire P, Crossley N, Lacerda A, Rohde LA, Miguel EC, Bressan RA, Jackowski AP

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The investigation of neurodevelopment during late childhood and pre-adolescence has recently attracted a great deal of interest in the field of neuroimaging. One promising topic in this field is the formation of brain networks in healthy subjects. The integration between neural modules characterizes the ability of the network to process information globally. Although many fMRI-based neurodevelopment studies can be found in the literature, the analyses of very large samples (on the order of hundreds of subjects) that focus on the late childhood/pre-adolescence period and resting state fMRI are scarce, and most studies have focused solely on North American and European populations.
AIMS: In this study, we present a descriptive investigation of the developmental formation of the Default Mode Network and the Control Network based on a Brazilian, cross-sectional community sample of 447 typically developing subjects aged 7-15 years old.
METHODS: Resting state fMRI data were acquired using two MRI systems from the same manufacturer using the same acquisition parameters. We estimated the age effects on the strength of the links (between brain regions) and the network features (graph descriptors: degree and eigenvector centrality).
RESULTS: Our findings showed an increase in the antero-posterior connectivity in both studied networks during brain development. The graph analyses showed an increase in centrality with age for most regions in the Default Mode Network and the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate, the right anterior insula and the left posterior temporal cortex in the Control Network.
CONCLUSION: We conclude that the period of 7-15 years of age is crucial for the development of both the Default Mode and Control networks, with integration between the posterior and anterior neuronal modules and an increase in the centrality measures of the hub regions.

PMID: 25085608 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

DynamicBC: A MATLAB Toolbox for Dynamic Brain Connectome Analysis.

Sun, 08/03/2014 - 12:30
Related Articles

DynamicBC: A MATLAB Toolbox for Dynamic Brain Connectome Analysis.

Brain Connect. 2014 Aug 1;

Authors: Liao W, Wu G, Xu Q, Ji GJ, Zhang Z, Zang YF, Lu G

Abstract
The brain connectome collects the complex network architectures, looking at both static and dynamic functional connectivity. The former normally requires stationary signals and connections. However, the human brain activity and connections are most likely time dependent and dynamic, and related to ongoing rhythmic activity. We developed an open-source MATLAB toolbox DynamicBC with user-friendly graphical user interfaces, implementing both dynamic functional and effective connectivity for tracking brain dynamics from functional MRI. We provided two strategies for dynamic analysis: 1) the commonly utilized sliding-window analysis and 2) the flexible least squares based time-varying parameter regression strategy. The toolbox also implements multiple functional measures including seed-to-voxel analysis, region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI analysis, and voxel-to-voxel analysis. We describe the principles of the implemented algorithms, and then present representative results from simulations and empirical data applications. We believe that this toolbox will help neuroscientists and neurologists to map easily dynamic brain connectomics.

PMID: 25083734 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]