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Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study.

Sat, 06/14/2014 - 14:00

Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study.

PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e98795

Authors: Schlumpf YR, Reinders AA, Nijenhuis ER, Luechinger R, van Osch MJ, Jäncke L

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part" (EP) and the "Apparently Normal Part" (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors.
METHODS: Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls.
RESULTS: Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events.
CONCLUSION: DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are consistent with TSDP and inconsistent with the idea that DID is caused by suggestion, fantasy proneness, and role-playing.

PMID: 24922512 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Functional connectivity in the basal ganglia network differentiates PD patients from controls.

Sat, 06/14/2014 - 14:00

Functional connectivity in the basal ganglia network differentiates PD patients from controls.

Neurology. 2014 Jun 11;

Authors: Szewczyk-Krolikowski K, Menke RA, Rolinski M, Duff E, Salimi-Khorshidi G, Filippini N, Zamboni G, Hu MT, Mackay CE

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine functional connectivity within the basal ganglia network (BGN) in a group of cognitively normal patients with early Parkinson disease (PD) on and off medication compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC), and to validate the findings in a separate cohort of participants with PD.METHODS: Participants were scanned with resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) at 3T field strength. Resting-state networks were isolated using independent component analysis. A BGN template was derived from 80 elderly HC participants. BGN maps were compared between 19 patients with PD on and off medication in the discovery group and 19 age- and sex-matched controls to identify a threshold for optimal group separation. The threshold was applied to 13 patients with PD (including 5 drug-naive) in the validation group to establish reproducibility of findings.RESULTS: Participants with PD showed reduced functional connectivity with the BGN in a wide range of areas. Administration of medication significantly improved connectivity. Average BGN connectivity differentiated participants with PD from controls with 100% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. The connectivity threshold was tested on the validation cohort and achieved 85% accuracy.CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that resting functional connectivity, measured with MRI using an observer-independent method, is reproducibly reduced in the BGN in cognitively intact patients with PD, and increases upon administration of dopaminergic medication. Our results hold promise for RS-fMRI connectivity as a biomarker in early PD.CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that average connectivity in the BGN as measured by RS-fMRI distinguishes patients with PD from age- and sex-matched controls.

PMID: 24920856 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Deficits in predictive coding underlie hallucinations in schizophrenia.

Sat, 06/14/2014 - 14:00

Deficits in predictive coding underlie hallucinations in schizophrenia.

J Neurosci. 2014 Jun 11;34(24):8072-82

Authors: Horga G, Schatz KC, Abi-Dargham A, Peterson BS

Abstract
The neural mechanisms that produce hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms remain unclear. Previous research suggests that deficits in predictive signals for learning, such as prediction error signals, may underlie psychotic symptoms, but the mechanism by which such deficits produce psychotic symptoms remains to be established. We used model-based fMRI to study sensory prediction errors in human patients with schizophrenia who report daily auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) and sociodemographically matched healthy control subjects. We manipulated participants' expectations for hearing speech at different periods within a speech decision-making task. Patients activated a voice-sensitive region of the auditory cortex while they experienced AVHs in the scanner and displayed a concomitant deficit in prediction error signals in a similar portion of auditory cortex. This prediction error deficit correlated strongly with increased activity during silence and with reduced volumes of the auditory cortex, two established neural phenotypes of AVHs. Furthermore, patients with more severe AVHs had more deficient prediction error signals and greater activity during silence within the region of auditory cortex where groups differed, regardless of the severity of psychotic symptoms other than AVHs. Our findings suggest that deficient predictive coding accounts for the resting hyperactivity in sensory cortex that leads to hallucinations.

PMID: 24920613 [PubMed - in process]

Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of cognitive function.

Sat, 06/14/2014 - 14:00

Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of cognitive function.

Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014 Jun 11;

Authors: Bigler ED

Abstract
Image quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain currently approximate gross anatomy as would be viewed at autopsy. During the first decade of the 21st Century incredible advances in image processing and quantification have occurred permitting more refined methods for studying brain-behavior-cognitive functioning. The current presentation overviews the current status of MRI methods for routine clinical assessment of brain pathology, how these techniques identify neuropathology and how pathological findings are quantified. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and resting state fMRI are all reviewed, emphasizing how these techniques permit an examination of brain function and connectivity. General regional relationships of brain function associated with cognitive control will be highlighted. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID: 24920351 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Brain differences between persistent and remitted attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Fri, 06/13/2014 - 13:00
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Brain differences between persistent and remitted attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Brain. 2014 Jun 10;

Authors: Mattfeld AT, Gabrieli JD, Biederman J, Spencer T, Brown A, Kotte A, Kagan E, Whitfield-Gabrieli S

Abstract
Previous resting state studies examining the brain basis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have not distinguished between patients who persist versus those who remit from the diagnosis as adults. To characterize the neurobiological differences and similarities of persistence and remittance, we performed resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in individuals who had been longitudinally and uniformly characterized as having or not having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in childhood and again in adulthood (16 years after baseline assessment). Intrinsic functional brain organization was measured in patients who had a persistent diagnosis in childhood and adulthood (n = 13), in patients who met diagnosis in childhood but not in adulthood (n = 22), and in control participants who never had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 17). A positive functional correlation between posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices, major components of the default-mode network, was reduced only in patients whose diagnosis persisted into adulthood. A negative functional correlation between medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was reduced in both persistent and remitted patients. The neurobiological dissociation between the persistence and remittance of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may provide a framework for the relation between the clinical diagnosis, which indicates the need for treatment, and additional deficits that are common, such as executive dysfunctions.

PMID: 24916335 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Functional connectivity changes between parietal and prefrontal cortices in primary insomnia patients: evidence from resting-state fMRI.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 18:00

Functional connectivity changes between parietal and prefrontal cortices in primary insomnia patients: evidence from resting-state fMRI.

Eur J Med Res. 2014 Jun 10;19(1):32

Authors: Li Y, Wang E, Zhang H, Dou S, Liu L, Tong L, Lei Y, Wang M, Xu J, Shi D, Zhang Q

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Primary insomnia can severely impair daytime function by disrupting attention and working memory and imposes a danger to self and others by increasing the risk of accidents. We speculated that the neurobiological changes impeding working memory in primary insomnia patients would be revealed by resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI), which estimates the strength of cortical pathways by measuring local and regional correlations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signs independent of specific task demands.
METHODS: We compared the R-fMRI activity patterns of 15 healthy controls to 15 primary insomnia patients (all 30 participants were right-handed) using a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The SPM8 and REST1.7 software packages were used for preprocessing and analysis. Activity was expressed relative to the superior parietal lobe (SPL, the seed region) to reveal differences in functional connectivity to other cortical regions implicated in spatial working memory.Result: In healthy controls, bilateral SPL activity was associated with activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus, indicating functional connectivity between these regions. Strong functional connectivity between the SPL and bilateral pre-motor cortex, bilateral supplementary motor cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was observed in both the control group and the primary insomnia group. However, the strength of several other functional connectivity pathways to the SPL exhibited significant group differences. Compared to healthy controls, connectivity in the primary insomnia group was stronger between the bilateral SPL and the right ventral anterior cingulate cortex, left ventral posterior cingulate cortex, right splenium of the corpus callosum, right pars triangularis (right inferior frontal gyrus/Broca's area), and right insular lobe, while connectivity was weaker between the SPL and right superior frontal gyrus (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex).
CONCLUSION: Primary insomnia appears to alter the functional connectivity between the parietal and frontal lobes, cortical structures critical for spatial and verbal working memory.

PMID: 24915847 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effects of Long-Term Acupuncture Treatment on Resting-State Brain Activity in Migraine Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Active Acupoints and Inactive Acupoints.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:30

Effects of Long-Term Acupuncture Treatment on Resting-State Brain Activity in Migraine Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Active Acupoints and Inactive Acupoints.

PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e99538

Authors: Zhao L, Liu J, Zhang F, Dong X, Peng Y, Qin W, Wu F, Li Y, Yuan K, von Deneen KM, Gong Q, Tang Z, Liang F

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been commonly used for preventing migraine attacks and relieving pain during a migraine, although there is limited knowledge on the physiological mechanism behind this method. The objectives of this study were to compare the differences in brain activities evoked by active acupoints and inactive acupoints and to investigate the possible correlation between clinical variables and brain responses.
METHODS AND RESULTS: A randomized controlled trial and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were conducted. A total of eighty migraineurs without aura were enrolled to receive either active acupoint acupuncture or inactive acupoint acupuncture treatment for 8 weeks, and twenty patients in each group were randomly selected for the fMRI scan at the end of baseline and at the end of treatment. The neuroimaging data indicated that long-term active acupoint therapy elicited a more extensive and remarkable cerebral response compared with acupuncture at inactive acupoints. Most of the regions were involved in the pain matrix, lateral pain system, medial pain system, default mode network, and cognitive components of pain processing. Correlation analysis showed that the decrease in the visual analogue scale (VAS) was significantly related to the increased average Regional homogeneity (ReHo) values in the anterior cingulate cortex in the two groups. Moreover, the decrease in the VAS was associated with increased average ReHo values in the insula which could be detected in the active acupoint group.
CONCLUSIONS: Long-term active acupoint therapy and inactive acupoint therapy have different brain activities. We postulate that acupuncture at the active acupoint might have the potential effect of regulating some disease-affected key regions and the pain circuitry for migraine, and promote establishing psychophysical pain homeostasis.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-13003635.

PMID: 24915066 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Preoperative Mapping of the Sensorimotor Cortex: Comparative Assessment of Task-Based and Resting-State fMRI.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:30

Preoperative Mapping of the Sensorimotor Cortex: Comparative Assessment of Task-Based and Resting-State fMRI.

PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e98860

Authors: Rosazza C, Aquino D, D'Incerti L, Cordella R, Andronache A, Zacà D, Bruzzone MG, Tringali G, Minati L

Abstract
Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has recently been considered as a possible complement or alternative to task-based fMRI (tb-fMRI) for presurgical mapping. However, evidence of its usefulness remains scant, because existing studies have investigated relatively small samples and focused primarily on qualitative evaluation. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical usefulness of rs-fMRI in the context of presurgical mapping of motor functions, and in particular to determine the degree of correspondence with tb-fMRI which, while not a gold-standard, is commonly used in preoperative setting. A group of 13 patients with lesions close to the sensorimotor cortex underwent rs-fMRI and tb-fMRI to localize the hand, foot and mouth motor areas. We assessed quantitatively the degree of correspondence between multiple rs-fMRI analyses (independent-component and seed-based analyses) and tb-fMRI, with reference to sensitivity and specificity of rs-fMRI with respect to tb-fMRI, and centre-of-mass distances. Agreement with electro-cortical stimulation (ECS) was also investigated, and a traditional map thresholding approach based on agreement between two experienced operators was compared to an automatic threshold determination method. Rs-fMRI can localize the sensorimotor cortex successfully, providing anatomical specificity for hand, foot and mouth motor subregions, in particular with seed-based analyses. Agreement with tb-fMRI was only partial and rs-fMRI tended to provide larger patterns of correlated activity. With respect to the ECS data available, rs-fMRI and tb-fMRI performed comparably, even though the shortest distance to stimulation points was observed for the latter. Notably, the results of both were on the whole robust to thresholding procedure. Localization performed by rs-fMRI is not equivalent to tb-fMRI, hence rs-fMRI cannot be considered as an outright replacement for tb-fMRI. Nevertheless, since there is significant agreement between the two techniques, rs-fMRI can be considered with caution as a potential alternative to tb-fMRI when patients are unable to perform the task.

PMID: 24914775 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Non-parametric Bayesian graph models reveal community structure in resting state fMRI.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:30

Non-parametric Bayesian graph models reveal community structure in resting state fMRI.

Neuroimage. 2014 Jun 7;

Authors: Andersen KW, Madsen KH, Siebner HR, Schmidt MN, Mørup M, Hansen LK

Abstract
Modeling of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data using network models is of increasing interest. It is often desirable to group nodes into clusters to interpret the communication patterns between nodes. In this study we consider three different nonparametric Bayesian models for node clustering in complex networks. In particular, we test their ability to predict unseen data and their ability to reproduce clustering across datasets. The three generative models considered are the Infinite Relational Model (IRM), Bayesian Community Detection (BCD), and the Infinite Diagonal Model (IDM). The models define probabilities of generating links within and between clusters and the difference between the models lie in the restrictions they impose upon the between-cluster link probabilities. IRM is the most flexible model with no restrictions on the probabilities of links between clusters. BCD restricts the between-cluster link probabilities to be strictly lower than within-cluster link probabilities to conform to the community structure typically seen in social networks. IDM only models a single between-cluster link probability, which can be interpreted as a background noise probability. These probabilistic models are compared against three other approaches for node clustering, namely Infomap, Louvain modularity, and hierarchical clustering. Using 3 different datasets comprising healthy volunteers' rs-fMRI we found that the BCD model was in general the most predictive and reproducible model. This suggests that rs-fMRI data exhibits community structure and furthermore points to the significance of modeling heterogeneous between-cluster link probabilities.

PMID: 24914522 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Neural signatures of the interaction between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and stressful life events in healthy women.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:30

Neural signatures of the interaction between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and stressful life events in healthy women.

Psychiatry Res. 2014 May 22;

Authors: Favaro A, Manara R, Pievani M, Clementi M, Forzan M, Bruson A, Tenconi E, Degortes D, Pinato C, Giannunzio V, Battista Frisoni G, Santonastaso P

Abstract
A change in neural connectivity of brain structures implicated in the memory of negative life events has been hypothesized to explain the enhancement of memory encoding during the processing of negative stimuli in depressed patients. Here, we investigated the effects of the interaction between negative life events and the 5-HTTLPR genotype - a polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene - on the functional and structural connectivity of the hippocampal area in 34 healthy women. All participants were genotyped for the presence of the 5-HTTLPR short variant and for the A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism; they underwent clinical assessment including structured diagnostic interviews to exclude the presence of psychiatric disorders and to assess the presence of stressful life events. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging scans were performed. We found significant interactions between stressful events and the 5-HTTLPR genotype in both the functional connectivity of the parahippocampus with the posterior cingulate cortex and the structural connectivity between the hippocampus and both the amygdala and the putamen. In addition, we found several genotype-related differences in the relationship between functional/structural connectivity of the hippocampal area and the ability to update expectations or stress-related phenotypes, such as anxiety symptoms. If confirmed by future studies, these mechanisms may clarify the role of the 5HTTLPR genotype as a risk factor for depression, in interaction with negative events.

PMID: 24914006 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Default mode network as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy-related brain injury.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:30

Default mode network as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy-related brain injury.

Neurobiol Aging. 2014 May 15;

Authors: Kesler SR

Abstract
Chronic medical conditions and/or their treatments may interact with aging to alter or even accelerate brain senescence. Adult onset cancer, for example, is a disease associated with advanced aging and emerging evidence suggests a profile of subtle but diffuse brain injury following cancer chemotherapy. Breast cancer is currently the primary model for studying these "chemobrain" effects. Given the widespread changes to brain structure and function as well as the common impairment of integrated cognitive skills observed following breast cancer chemotherapy, it is likely that large-scale brain networks are involved. Default mode network (DMN) is a strong candidate considering its preferential vulnerability to aging and sensitivity to toxicity and disease states. Additionally, chemotherapy is associated with several physiological effects including increased inflammation and oxidative stress that are believed to elevate toxicity in the DMN. Biomarkers of DMN connectivity could aid in the development of treatments for chemotherapy-related cognitive decline.

PMID: 24913897 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Phase Based Venous Suppression in Resting-State BOLD GE-fMRI.

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 16:00

Phase Based Venous Suppression in Resting-State BOLD GE-fMRI.

Neuroimage. 2014 Jun 4;

Authors: Curtis AT, Matthew Hutchison R, Menon RS

Abstract
Resting-state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) is a widely used method for inferring connectivity between brain regions or nodes. As with task-based fMRI, the spatial specificity of the connectivity maps can be distorted by the strong biasing effect of the BOLD signal in macroscopic veins. In RS-fMRI this effect is exacerbated by the temporal coherences of physiological origin between large veins that are widely distributed in the brain. In gradient echo based EPI, used for the vast majority of RS-fMRI, macroscopic veins that carry BOLD-related changes exhibit a strong phase response. This allows for post-processing identification and removal of venous signals using a phase regressor technique. Here, we employ this approach to suppress macrovascular venous contributions in high-field whole-brain RS-fMRI data sets, resulting in significant changes to both the spatial localization of the networks and the correlations between the network nodes. These effects were observed at both the individual and group analysis level, suggesting that venous contamination is a confounding factor for RS-fMRI studies even at relatively low image resolutions. Suppression of the macrovascular signal using the phase regression approach may therefore help to better identify, delineate, and interpret the true structure of large-scale brain networks.

PMID: 24907484 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Abnormal functional connectivity within the default mode network in Patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without hepatic encephalopathy revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 16:00

Abnormal functional connectivity within the default mode network in Patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without hepatic encephalopathy revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

Brain Res. 2014 Jun 4;

Authors: Qi R, Zhang LJ, Xu Q, Liang X, Luo S, Zhang Z, Huang W, Zheng L, Lu GM

Abstract
By means of "task free" resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), abnormal functional connectivity (FC) of the default mode network (DMN) in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has been reported; however, little is known about the changes of DMN in cirrhotic patients without overt or minimal HE. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a disruption of the FC within the DMN in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhosis without any signs of HE. Fifty one patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without HE and 61 age- and gender- matched healthy controls underwent the rs-fMRI. Seed-based region-to-region FC was used to analyze the connectivity between each pair of regions within the DMN, including posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampal formation (HF), inferior parietal cortex (IPC), and medial temporal lobe (MTL). Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the abnormal FC strength within DMN and venous blood ammonia levels in patients. Compared with the controls, patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without HE demonstrated significantly decreased region-to-region FC between the mPFC and bilateral MTL, right HF, and left IPC, as well as between the right MTL and left IPC, right HF, and PCC. A significant negative relationship was observed between blood ammonia levels and connectivity strength between the mPFC and left IPC in patients. These results suggest that patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without HE had disrupted functional connectivty within the DMN, even before the appearance of minimal HE.

PMID: 24907446 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Acupuncture Stimulation of Taichong (Liv3) and Hegu (LI4) Modulates the Default Mode Network Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 16:00

Acupuncture Stimulation of Taichong (Liv3) and Hegu (LI4) Modulates the Default Mode Network Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2014 Jun 6;

Authors: Liang P, Wang Z, Qian T, Li K

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The acupuncture has been used in the therapy of Alzheimer disease (AD), however, its neural underpins are still unclear. The aim of this study is to examine the acupuncture effect on the default mode network (DMN) in AD by using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI).
METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects (14 AD and 14 normal controls (NC)) participated in this study. RS-fMRI data were acquired before and after acupuncture, while during the acupuncture, the procession of acupuncture stimulation on the acupoints of Tai chong (Liv3) and Hegu (LI4) lasted for 3 minutes.
RESULTS: Region of interest analysis showed that the impaired DMN connectivity in AD (identified by comparing the pre-acupuncture RS-fMRI of AD and NC), specifically the left cingulate gyrus (CG) and right inferior parietal lobule (IPL), were significantly changed for the better. The whole-brain exploratory analysis further demonstrated these results and found some new regions respond to the acupuncture effect on AD, with a cluster in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) together with right IPL showed increased within-DMN connectivity; and the bilateral CG and left PCu showed decreased within-DMN connectivity. Moreover, the acupuncture effect on the right MTG was significantly correlated with disease severity as measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores.
CONCLUSION: It was found that the acupuncture stimulation could modulate the DMN activity in AD. The current findings suggest that the acupuncture treatment on the relative earlier AD patients might have a better therapy effect.

PMID: 24906968 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Modeling distinct imaging hemodynamics early after TBI: the relationship between signal amplitude and connectivity.

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 16:00

Modeling distinct imaging hemodynamics early after TBI: the relationship between signal amplitude and connectivity.

Brain Imaging Behav. 2014 Jun 7;

Authors: Medaglia JD, McAleavey AA, Rostami S, Slocomb J, Hillary FG

Abstract
Over the past decade, fMRI studies of cognitive change following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have investigated blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activity during working memory (WM) performance in individuals in early and chronic phases of recovery. Recently, BOLD fMRI work has largely shifted to focus on WM and resting functional connectivity following TBI. However, fundamental questions in WM remain. Specifically, the effects of injury on the basic relationships between local and interregional functional neuroimaging signals during WM processing early following moderate to severe TBI have not been examined. This study employs a mixed effects model to examine prefrontal cortex and parietal lobe signal change during a WM task, the n-back, and whether there is covariance between regions of high amplitude signal change, (synchrony of elicited activity (SEA) very early following TBI. We also examined whether signal change and SEA differentially predict performance during WM. Overall, percent signal change in the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC) was and important predictor of both reaction time (RT) and SEA in early TBI and matched controls. Right prefrontal cortex (rPFC) percent signal change positively predicted SEA within and between persons regardless of injury status, suggesting that the link between these neurodynamic processes in WM-activated regions remains unaffected even very early after TBI. Additionally, rPFC activity was positively related to RT within and between persons in both groups. Right parietal (rPAR) activity was negatively related to RT within subjects in both groups. Thus, the local signal intensity of the rPFC in TBI appears to be a critical property of network functioning and performance in WM processing and may be a precursor to recruitment observed in chronic samples. The present results suggest that as much research moves toward large scale functional connectivity modeling, it will be essential to develop integrated models of how local and distant neurodynamics promote WM performance after TBI.

PMID: 24906546 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Corrigendum: Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness.

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 17:30

Corrigendum: Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness.

Front Neuroinform. 2014;8:50

Authors: Andronache AS, Rosazza C, Sattin D, Leonardi M, D'Incerti L, Minati L

Abstract
[This corrects the article on p. 16 in vol. 7, PMID: 23986694.].

PMID: 24904396 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Imaging the where and when of tic generation and resting state networks in adult Tourette patients.

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 17:30

Imaging the where and when of tic generation and resting state networks in adult Tourette patients.

Front Hum Neurosci. 2014;8:362

Authors: Neuner I, Werner CJ, Arrubla J, Stöcker T, Ehlen C, Wegener HP, Schneider F, Shah NJ

Abstract
Introduction: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with the core phenomenon of tics, whose origin and temporal pattern are unclear. We investigated the When and Where of tic generation and resting state networks (RSNs) via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: Tic-related activity and the underlying RSNs in adult TS were studied within one fMRI session. Participants were instructed to lie in the scanner and to let tics occur freely. Tic onset times, as determined by video-observance were used as regressors and added to preceding time-bins of 1 s duration each to detect prior activation. RSN were identified by independent component analysis (ICA) and correlated to disease severity by the means of dual regression. Results: Two seconds before a tic, the supplementary motor area (SMA), ventral primary motor cortex, primary sensorimotor cortex and parietal operculum exhibited activation; 1 s before a tic, the anterior cingulate, putamen, insula, amygdala, cerebellum and the extrastriatal-visual cortex exhibited activation; with tic-onset, the thalamus, central operculum, primary motor and somatosensory cortices exhibited activation. Analysis of resting state data resulted in 21 components including the so-called default-mode network. Network strength in those regions in SMA of two premotor ICA maps that were also active prior to tic occurrence, correlated significantly with disease severity according to the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTTS) scores. Discussion: We demonstrate that the temporal pattern of tic generation follows the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit, and that cortical structures precede subcortical activation. The analysis of spontaneous fluctuations highlights the role of cortical premotor structures. Our study corroborates the notion of TS as a network disorder in which abnormal RSN activity might contribute to the generation of tics in SMA.

PMID: 24904391 [PubMed]

Habits: bridging the gap between personhood and personal identity.

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 17:30

Habits: bridging the gap between personhood and personal identity.

Front Hum Neurosci. 2014;8:330

Authors: Wagner NF, Northoff G

Abstract
In philosophy, the criteria for personhood (PH) at a specific point in time (synchronic), and the necessary and sufficient conditions of personal identity (PI) over time (diachronic) are traditionally separated. Hence, the transition between both timescales of a person's life remains largely unclear. Personal habits reflect a decision-making (DM) process that binds together synchronic and diachronic timescales. Despite the fact that the actualization of habits takes place synchronically, they presuppose, for the possibility of their generation, time in a diachronic sense. The acquisition of habits therefore rests upon PI over time; that is, the temporal extension of personal decisions is the necessary condition for the possible development of habits. Conceptually, habits can thus be seen as a bridge between synchronic and diachronic timescales of a person's life. In order to investigate the empirical mediation of this temporal linkage, we draw upon the neuronal mechanisms underlying DM; in particular on the distinction between internally and externally guided DM. Externally guided DM relies on external criteria at a specific point in time (synchronic); on a neural level, this has been associated with lateral frontal and parietal brain regions. In contrast, internally guided DM is based on the person's own preferences that involve a more longitudinal and thus diachronic timescale, which has been associated with the brain's intrinsic activity. Habits can be considered to reflect a balance between internally and externally guided DM, which implicates a particular temporal balance between diachronic and synchronic elements, thus linking two different timescales. Based on such evidence, we suggest a habit-based neurophilosophical approach of PH and PI by focusing on the empirically-based linkage between the synchronic and diachronic elements of habits. By doing so, we propose to link together what philosophically has been described and analyzed separately as PH and PI.

PMID: 24904370 [PubMed]

Phase-amplitude coupling and infraslow (<1 Hz) frequencies in the rat brain: relationship to resting state fMRI.

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 17:30

Phase-amplitude coupling and infraslow (<1 Hz) frequencies in the rat brain: relationship to resting state fMRI.

Front Integr Neurosci. 2014;8:41

Authors: Thompson GJ, Pan WJ, Billings JC, Grooms JK, Shakil S, Jaeger D, Keilholz SD

Abstract
Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can identify network alterations that occur in complex psychiatric diseases and behaviors, but its interpretation is difficult because the neural basis of the infraslow BOLD fluctuations is poorly understood. Previous results link dynamic activity during the resting state to both infraslow frequencies in local field potentials (LFP) (<1 Hz) and band-limited power in higher frequency LFP (>1 Hz). To investigate the relationship between these frequencies, LFPs were recorded from rats under two anesthetics: isoflurane and dexmedetomidine. Signal phases were calculated from low-frequency LFP and compared to signal amplitudes from high-frequency LFP to determine if modulation existed between the two frequency bands (phase-amplitude coupling). Isoflurane showed significant, consistent phase-amplitude coupling at nearly all pairs of frequencies, likely due to the burst-suppression pattern of activity that it induces. However, no consistent phase-amplitude coupling was observed in rats that were anesthetized with dexmedetomidine. fMRI-LFP correlations under isoflurane using high frequency LFP were reduced when the low frequency LFP's influence was accounted for, but not vice-versa, or in any condition under dexmedetomidine. The lack of consistent phase-amplitude coupling under dexmedetomidine and lack of shared variance between high frequency and low frequency LFP as it relates to fMRI suggests that high and low frequency neural electrical signals may contribute differently, possibly even independently, to resting state fMRI. This finding suggests that researchers take care in interpreting the neural basis of resting state fMRI, as multiple dynamic factors in the underlying electrophysiology could be driving any particular observation.

PMID: 24904325 [PubMed]

Identifying and Characterizing Resting State Networks in Temporally Dynamic Functional Connectomes.

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 17:30

Identifying and Characterizing Resting State Networks in Temporally Dynamic Functional Connectomes.

Brain Topogr. 2014 Jun 6;

Authors: Zhang X, Li X, Jin C, Chen H, Li K, Zhu D, Jiang X, Zhang T, Lv J, Hu X, Han J, Zhao Q, Guo L, Li L, Liu T

Abstract
An important application of resting state fMRI data has been to identify resting state networks (RSN). The conventional RSN studies attempted to discover consistent networks through functional connectivity analysis over the whole scan time, which implicitly assumes that RSNs are static. However, the brain undergoes dynamic functional state changes and the functional connectome patterns vary along with time, even in resting state. Hence, this study aims to characterize temporal brain dynamics in resting state. It utilizes the temporally dynamic functional connectome patterns to extract a set of resting state clusters and their corresponding RSNs based on the large-scale consistent, reproducible and predictable whole-brain reference system of dense individualized and common connectivity-based cortical landmarks (DICCCOL). Especially, an effective multi-view spectral clustering method was performed by treating each dynamic functional connectome pattern as one view, and this procedure was also applied on static multi-subject functional connectomes to obtain the static clusters for comparison. It turns out that some dynamic clusters exhibit high similarity with static clusters, suggesting the stability of those RSNs including the visual network and the default mode network. Moreover, two motor-related dynamic clusters show correspondence with one static cluster, which implies substantially more temporal variability of the motor resting network. Particularly, four dynamic clusters exhibited large differences in comparison with their corresponding static networks. Thus it is suggested that these four networks might play critically important roles in functional brain dynamics and interactions during resting state, offering novel insights into the brain function and its dynamics.

PMID: 24903106 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]